Three Simple Steps
Podcast #27 — Aired May 8, 2014

“Our lives are not meant to be a struggle, but a joyful trip.” Those are the words of Trevor Blake, successful entrepreneur and the author of Three Simple Steps, who we’ll be talking with this week on BetterWorldians Radio. Blake will share his compelling life experiences and the lessons he has learned along the way. He’ll discuss how listeners can use the tips in his book to make their own lives a more joyful trip. Tune in every week to hear new guests share how they are making the world a better place and to learn how you can become a BetterWorldian!

 

 

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Trevor Blake
Author, Three Simple Steps
Co-Founder and CEO, Kalvi Medical LLC

Trevor Blake, author of Three Simple Steps, is a serial entreprenuer. He was founder and CEO of QOL Medical LLC, a company focused on solutions for rare diseases that he started in 2002 with a few thousand dollars. Its virtual business model was unique in an industry crying our for change, it was the top grossing nonemployer in the United States, and it sold in 2010 for over $100 million. In 2006 Trevor founded ANU, a unique not-for-profit he dedicated to developing low side-effect cancer drugs. In 2011 he co-founded Kalvi Medical LLC and is its CEO. Trevor has worked in the UK, Europe, and the United States with companies such as Lipha, 3M, and Biogen and has won many industry awards, including marketing professional of the year. A graduate of Britannia Royal Naval College in the UK, he has a degree in radiography, and an MBA from Durham University, also in the UK.

Episode Transcript

Raymond Hansell
Joining us today is Trevor Blake, a serial entrepreneur and author of the book, "Three Simple Steps." He was founder and CEO of QOL Medical, LLC, a company focused on solutions for rare diseases that he started in 2002 with a few thousand dollars. Its virtual business model was unique in an industry crying out for change at the time and it was the top grossing non-employer of the United States. The business sold in 2010 or over $100 million. In 2006, Trevor founded ANU, a unique not for profit dedicated to developing low side effect cancerous drugs. In 2011, he co-founded Kalvi Medical, LLC and he's currently the CEO. Trevor has worked in the U.K., Europe, and the United States with companies as diverse as Litha, 3M and Biogen and has won many industry awards including Marketing Professional of the year. A graduate of Britannia Royal Navy College of the U.K., he has a degree in radiography and an MBA from Durham University also in the U.K. Trevor, it's great to have you join us today on BetterWorldians Radio. Thanks for coming on board.

Trevor Blake
Thank you, Ray. Thanks for the introduction, too.

Raymond Hansell
Oh, you're very, very welcome. But before I begin, I'd just like to tell you that I'm a big fan of your book and actually read your case. And we always read the books of the authors that are on the show, but I've read this several times and the people here that are around here, the co-hosts kept saying to me, "Why are you giving me this book?" It sounds like you wrote it. I said, "No, I didn't write the book. This guy Trevor Blake from Britain and now in America has written the book." But there's so many similarities that I was -- I actually have four statues behind my desk; one of Walt Disney with his biography, Charles Schultz from Peanuts, and Bill Gates and Steven Jobs. So I thought well, he mentions Walt Disney and he talks an awful lot about actually going ahead and doing things before they're realized. I was famous for actually going into open houses that were for sale that had price tags that we couldn't possibly afford and speaking to them about what we would do once we moved in. And then finally was entertaining seminars when going public about 10 years before we went, so I think you must have been thinking or we must have been on similar wavelengths when I read this book.

Trevor Blake
Well, I think we are because that's the form of -- I show it window shopping for the dream. It's what you have to do if you want to imagine some -- if you're not happy with the life where it is now and you want to change your life, then what you have to do is do it in your imagination first and then that really helps with the realization in our sleazy world is that dream. So it's all window shopping and it's a lot of fun and very easy to do.

Raymond Hansell
Mm-hmm. Yeah, I think too many people suffer from just the opposite. Their window shopping is in pretty bad neighborhoods and so they tend to actually start imaging that, "Oh, this is going to get worse, this is what's going to happen next." And that kind of serial thinking leads to nowhere. But I'd like to begin our conversation of the "Three Simple Steps" with a beautiful story about your mom, Audrey, and how you learned from her the importance of controlling your mentality. Can you tell us a little bit about that?

Trevor Blake
Well, yeah. My mother was given six months to live when I was eight years old and I was actually -- I was sneaking and looking through into the kitchen one day when I saw her grimace in pain. She was washing dishes in the sink and she dropped a dish and then grabbed her chest and then she immediately put her finger up through the window at the sky and she said, "If you think I'm coming now, you're mistaken. I'm not coming until my three children are grown up and safely left the nest." And then she was aware that someone was watching. And that was the first time that I ever saw what unshakeable belief looks like. And it was just in her eyes. I was mesmerized by it. Here's my mother who I knew, you know, I was counting the days down because I'd been told that she had six months to live and I was to day 152 or something like that. The sort of thing you do as a kid. And she just looked at me and I saw that look in her eyes and I just thought, you know, she's serious about this, she's not going anywhere. And in my adult life whenever I face [TECHNICAL] which has been all the time of course in business. It's rare in business for people to say, "Oh, you're really good at what you do and go ahead and do it." Most people say you're not qualified, it's a stupid idea, it'll never work. And every time I came across those challenges, all I had to do was remember that look in my mother's eyes and it just inspired to take on this challenge.

Raymond Hansell
It's pretty amazing when somebody actually puts their finger up in the air and straightens God out.

Trevor Blake
[LAUGHS] Yes, it is. It's a beautiful thing and it's in the book and I've talked about it many times. But it's the sort of the thing that you only have to see once in your life for it to have a profound effect.

Raymond Hansell
I can see that. Now you've used this control your mentality to improve your own life. Can you tell us how that's worked?

Trevor Blake
Well, yeah. So controlling mentality is -- I'm not a big fan of the self-help movement as it is currently portrayed simply because I don't believe that positive thinking is actually possible because our thoughts happen instantaneously. They happen almost at the speed of light and so it's very hard to see something or hear something you don't like and have a positive thought. Typically, we'd have a negative thought and that's okay. That's how the brain works. So we have no control over how we think. But what we do have a hundred percent control over is how we then react to what we think. So mentality control is very much about recognizing the thoughts you've just had and the potential harm that it might do is and then choosing a different reaction. So simple ideas may be if somebody walks up to you and, "Oh, you look tired today." You know, if we don't react to that then within 15-20 minutes we start to see a picture of ourselves looking in the mirror and our sallow face and feeling tired. And then suddenly we start to feel tired. And so what we have to do is remember to react to things like that. So when people look at me and say, "Oh, you look tired today, Trevor." I would always react with something like, "You know, you're right, I could use more energy." And it's just a very subtle, very simple change in how I react to the thought that I would have had about being tired. And of course I do -- I start to feel more energetic. So it's just these simple things. And if you learn to do them in the simple aspects of life, then you can use that as a tool in the more difficult challenges in life. So for instance if you were starting a company and you were in front of your bank manager and the bank manager says, "This is a crazy idea. I'm not putting money into this silly idea." You know, because you now have control of your mentality, you'll stop and pause and you'll react to that in a more beneficial way than you would do if you didn't have this understanding that we can't control our thoughts, but we can control our reactions.

Raymond Hansell
And you also point out in the book that we can cut out words in our vocabulary that may find their way into our thinking as well. What are some of these words and phrases we should be trying to literally cut out of our vocabulary?

Trevor Blake
Well, I don't -- most people wouldn't be surprised by the words like I can't, can't say, I hate. But I think we have to take a step back and understand why those words are harmful and there needs to be -- I'm a scientist by nature and I have a physics degree and a perpetual student of quantum physics. So the information that's in "Three Simple Steps" is not based on any new age, feel good ideology. It's based on the cooking edge of neuroscience. And neuroscience, we now have the technology to look inside the brain and see what happens when the brain is exposed to certain words and it's really interesting when that happens. We can lighten our brain up or we can shift it down by the words that we use. And the reason for that is that words trigger thoughts and although it's sounds new age, thoughts are a form of energy and the reason we now know scientifically that they're energetic is that they're caused by neurotransmitters. So the neuro chemical reaction has an energy to it and the laws of energy say that energy can't be created or destroyed, it can only be changed into another form. So the neuro chemical reaction that causes the thought gets transferred into the thought. And so we can now actually see -- Japanese scientists have now actually finally filmed what a thought looks like and it's this little packet of energy. And that's really exciting, but it's also like a double edged sword because energy can only be transferred into its material equivalent. So if you have a thought about something that's good for you, that's good. That'll come back as good. But if you have a thought about something that's not good for you, we'll guess what? That thought's coming back and this is now a scientific principle. So you have to be very careful about how you use your thoughts. So for instance if you were to say something like, "I want to lose five pounds," if you feel like you're a bit overweight, well those thoughts of losing weight are what go out to the universe and they come back and put you in a position where you still need to lose weight. So you end up trapped. I call it quick sand and you end up, the harder you try to get rid of something, the harder you try to fight to gain something, the more you get stuck with the very thing that you're trying to fight against. And this is what usually traps most people and it's not their fault. It's just that they don't understand how the algorithms of thought becoming energy becoming material experience works and that's what we talk about in "Three Simple Steps." And step one about mentality control is that you really need to think about that and so the secret is to have more thoughts about what you want and less thoughts about what you don't want and that's what changes your experiences in life.

Raymond Hansell
Now you also write -- that's interesting, very interesting. You write that controlling your mentality is simple, but not easy like a lot of things in life. It's not one-two-three simple or easy. It still requires effort. So you have to develop a trick if you could share, if you would, with listeners called the mentality shield. Could you elaborate on that a bit?

Trevor Blake
Yeah, yeah, well, we live in a world that's incredibly noisy and it's very hard to separate yourself from a lot of those sort of negative, unhelpful, unbeneficial words in the world. So you can't go into a restaurant without seeing a TV and even if you go into a restaurant where the TV has the sound put down, it's typically on a news channel or a sports channel which has sensational news headlines going along the ticker -- along the bottom. And it's hard to get away from that. So you have to learn to protect yourself from a lot of that. The other thing that you have to protect yourself from is the people in our environment because it's rare that you can be amongst a group of people where they're not actually complaining about something they don't want. I mean you've got a rare group here on this radio where you probably spend a lot of time talking about making a better world. That's a rare thing. So if you're the sort of person who wants to improve their life, then you have to have a way to protect yourself when you're in that crowd or surrounded by that type of noise. And one of the things that you can use is a technique that comes from ancient medicine, but it's also used by the self-made men and women of history. And it's the self-made men and women of history that I get all this information from because as a young man, I was addicted to reading biographies and autobiographies and everything that's in "Three Simple Steps" is taken from the things that the great men like you mentioned, like Walt Disney, Henry Ford, Andrew Carnegie, Samuel Colt, Madam CJ Walker. These are all the heroes that I had -- the historical heroes who gave me this advice. And what they all had a technique for protecting themselves against the naysayers in their environment at the time. And they called it the deflection spell. I call it a mentality shield. And basically what it is, is that you simply imagine that this shield or this bell jar or whatever you prefer to imagine descends from the sky and it covers you completely and it protects you and then you can imagine all of the naysayers around you, their words are like a string of letters that have been fired towards you and they bounce off this shield and turn to dust and fall to the ground. Not that all sounds very new agey, but it's actually a well-known psychotherapy technique for defending yourself in a hostile environment. And a lot of sports people, people use this technique because he could have been a really top player and he was struggling because he was affected by the hostility of the crowd around him. He used this technique and he became a top player. I don't know their names, but I'm told there are several baseball pitchers who also use the same thing. And you can see them when they go the mound, that they look up to the sky and it looks like they're looking up to God for help or something, but it's not. They're imagining the shield come down. So that's the things that I use all the time in business. I wouldn't go into a boardroom meeting without putting my shield on. I wouldn't go amongst a crowd without wearing my shield and it just gives you that sense of protection that this energy that's coming your way gets broken up and you can remain secure and in your mentality control.

Raymond Hansell
Well, we're going to take a short break right. So I encourage all of our listeners to put their mentality shields up to some extent, but please listen to some of the commercial along the way. We'll be back shortly to talk more with Trevor Blake, author of "Three Simple Steps" and our co-host MarySue. In the meantime, I'd like to offer this challenge to our listeners. If you know someone whose acts, no matter how small, are making a difference in the lives of other people, boy would we love to hear about them. Please send us an email at radio@BetterWorldians.com and now we'll be right back. [MUSIC] >> The internet's number one talk station. Number one talk station. VoiceAmerica.com. [MUSIC] >> How can we make it a better world? >> I think we can make it a better world if we had peace among each other. >> Everybody needs to help their neighbor and then we'll spread from then on. >> I should do more. >> I can do more. >> I spend so much time on Facebook. >> How much time do I spend on Facebook? >> Probably more than I should be spending. >> I would definitely give back if I could find the time. >> Now you can help others just by playing a game on Facebook. It's called A Better World. Share your hopes and dreams. Do good deeds. Make a difference and have fun. Become a BetterWorldian. Join a community where all good deeds get rewarded. Log in today to find out how you can make a difference every day. >> For more information, visit Facebook.com\ABetterWorld. [MUSIC] >> Ask the experts. Call toll free right now, 1-866-472-5787. Hello? And ask our all-star team to answer your questions. That's 1-866-472-5787. Thank you for calling. VoiceAmerica.com. [MUSIC] >> This is BetterWorldians Radio with a family team of Ray, MarySue, and Gregory Hansell. To connect with the show today, please call us at 1-866-472-5788. That's 1-866-472-5788. You may also send us an email to radio@betterworldians.com. Now, back to BetterWorldians Radio. [MUSIC]

MarySue Hansell
Hi Trevor.

Trevor Blake
Hi, MarySue.

MarySue Hansell
You know, can you tell us a bit about recognizing the unwanted patterns that you mention in your book and why it's so important to change them?

Trevor Blake
Yes, that's a good question actually because in the previous section we talked about how thoughts are forms of energy and energy creates material experience, but what we also -- and that's a scientific principle. Now with that same scientific study shows that the brain works more like a muscle than we ever realized. And so the neurons, especially the mirror neurons which are in the front of the brain which are what allow us to observe the world and mimic behavior. They work almost like barbs and so we see something or feel something, some kind of emotional stimulus outside of ourselves and those neurons hone right into it and they hook onto it. And they become almost like little addictive neurons or little addicts because once they get that stimulus, they want more and more and more of it and they keep seeking the same thing out all the time. That's why if you're in a bunch of complainers, you could go in feeling on top of the world and if you don't protect yourself with a mentality shield or some other technique, then within an hour or two you become a complainer as well yourself. And so what happens is that then on the micro level we can see how that works, but on the macro level in terms of our life and our life behavior, you can see that how patterns of behavior get repeated over and over simply because the neurons are addicted to getting the same stimulus. And so there are obvious examples of how people who live in a abusive relationship leave that relationship and then find themselves back in an abuse relationship over and over again. But another aspect for the life it shows up, too. So typically who are weighed down by debt get out of debt and then back in debt again. And it's because the brain wants to repeat that same stimulus. And the brain doesn't have a moral code. It doesn't care what the stimulus is, whether it's good for you or bad for you. It just wants the stimulus. And so once you recognize that, once you realize how this whole behavior for the cause and effect is working, then you can start to look at the patterns of behavior in your life and start to see how things may be have been repeated over and over. How you started an exciting job and then it became dull and stressful and then you left and you got another exciting job and then it became dull and stressful and you left. Once you start to see those patterns of behavior, then you recognize them and you can say, okay, that's what I'm going to change. And it's in those reactions that make the difference. In my own life, it was more of an ancestral pattern in that I could see how my father tried his hand at over 20 different companies and every single one of them failed. And they all failed for the same reason. But because I was awake and aware, because I've been -- I'd educated myself from reading those autobiographies of really successful entrepreneurs, I was able to see how that pattern of behavior has occurred in his life and then I started to recognize it in my life. So I said, "You know what? That's me. I'm behaving exactly the same way. I'm starting things, getting bored and not finishing them." And so I decided to change that and it was that decision to change that led to me having a successful life as serial entrepreneur.

MarySue Hansell
That's a good point. You mention in your book about having a formal commitment to make a change. How do you do that?

Trevor Blake
You know, it's kind of ritualistic in a way, but it's very important to commit both to you, your subconscious, and to the world that I do want to change. And the reason I make a big deal in "Three Simple Steps" about making a commitment, is that change isnt for everybody because it requires a lot of effort for one thing. It requires discipline. But also when you change, when you make a positive change, you lift your head up above the crowd or you also tend to step outside of everybody else's comfort zone and we all would think that everybody around us who loves us would be there applauding our decision to make something of our lives. But I found it to be pretty much the opposite of that in that what you tend to cause is those people have a reflection on their own life. They don't like the life that they see and they tend to resent the fact that you're trying to do something. So you have to be aware of the consequences of change. There's no going back and it's not for everybody. But you have to make the decision. You have to say, "Okay, I'm going to change and move forward from here." Or, "I'm not going to change. I'm going to stay here." And it's that decision that's really important because life's frustration is not caused by the decision, it's caused by indecision. It's caused by feeling you should be doing more, but too afraid to do it or feeling that people want you to do more, but you're actually happy where you are. Once you make that decision to be happy where you are or to move forward, it's a very important moment in your life and there's no going back. But it doesn't matter what your decision is. No one's going to condemn either decision. But it's really important to make it.

MarySue Hansell
You know, many of our BetterWorldian guests reveal that they have some form of meditation practice in their lives. And you talk in your book about the importance of quiet time. It was -- I read about that Henry Ford practiced in the rocking chair his farmhouse and Madam Walker in the woods. Why is having this quiet time so important?

Trevor Blake
Well, first of all I call it taking quiet time because I'm not very good at meditating. I've tried all kinds of techniques and I have trouble quieting down my brain very much. But what I realized again in all of these autobiographies was that they all had a way of getting far from the maddening crowd, getting away from the noise and doing very little else than sitting and contemplating. And one of the things I come across a lot now that I'm more of an investor than a entrepreneur, is that people say, "Oh, you know, I really want to start my own company. I really want to change my life. I just don't have any great ideas." And one of the benefits of taking quiet time or doing any form of meditation is that you put yourself in a position to have greater ideas and the reasons why you put yourself in a position to have great ideas is that for 20 to 30 minutes of the day when you sit and do nothing, you don't have to chant, you don't have to look at candle, you don't have to wear a purple caftan and sit on a pointed rock. None of those things. All you've got to do is sit in a chair for 20 minutes with your phone off, no disturbance, no background noise if you can achieve that. For 20 minutes you allow your neurons and there's a hundred billion neurons in everybody's brain. You allow those neurons to work at a speed of light undistracted. The rest of the day we use our technology which we think is helping us to become more productive, but our brains have to slow down almost to a crawl to allow us to create kinetic energy to coordinate our muscles to type of this tiny keyboards or to translates photons into what we're seeing or to try translate my thoughts into a voice to a language that everyone else can understand. To do all those mechanical tasks that we have on a daily basis, the brain has to slow down almost to a crawl. And so it's a wonderful thing to allow your brain for 20 minutes every day or 30 minutes to do nothing except be a brain. And those hundred billion neurons, they produce 125 trillion signals per second when the brain's left undistracted and that's very powerful and that can't do anything but help you. And so what I've found by sort of personal experience over the years is if I take quiet time every day for 20 minutes, sometimes you're in that day I get a brilliant breakthrough idea and it's like a lightning bolt and it's not just a, "Oh, that's a good idea." It's almost like a blueprint that comes into my head and then you're straight away off to create another company or to do something else. And what I found since I've been as an entrepreneur, is that ever other successful entrepreneur that I've met meditates in some form, but most of them don't admit it.

MarySue Hansell
Oh, really. That's really interesting.

Trevor Blake
Mm-hmm.

MarySue Hansell
I know I love that quiet time. What are some of the personal benefits that you attain? You mention these brilliant ideas. Is there one that you can share that our listeners can understand the benefits that you can get from this?

Trevor Blake
Well, all of my companies have come from taking quiet time and then later on I'd just be distracted doing something and suddenly this lightning idea comes in. So my very first company came to me that way. I'd taken quiet time and I'd left my hotel and I was heading to the airport and I was just about to get on an elevator and this idea hit me. And it hit me so hard and it was so full. It wasn't just an idea for a company, it was how the company would be structured and how I would make this amazing new thing happen in America. Something that had never been done before. It was so profound that I actually yelled out loud in the middle of the crowd --

MarySue Hansell
[Overlapping speakers] What?

Trevor Blake
-- in Minneapolis airport. And I know it was just fantastic. So then when I got on the plane I did the thing you see in movies which is I got a Northwest Airlines as they were then napkin and drew on the back of this napkin the structure of this company. And then I got home and the rest is history, if you like. So that happens on a regular basis. I get more emails from readers of "Three Simple Steps" about the brilliant ideas they've had once they started taking quiet time and make it a regular daily habit. And they love it. Of course it's a wonderful time of the day because when you think about it, most of us don't allow ourselves even 20 minutes for ourselves.

MarySue Hansell
Yes.

Trevor Blake
All of our days are taken up taking care of other people and doing other things or working for other people. So if you give yourself 20 minutes just for yourself, even if you didn't get a great idea, would have a fantastic mental and health benefit as well. But the reason I have taking quiet time done in the way it's done in "Three Simple Steps" is to put yourself in a position to have winning ideas because it's a moment of insight that makes a difference. That great phrase, a moment of insight is worth a lifetime of experience. So that's all you need is one great idea to change your life.

MarySue Hansell
That's great. I don't know why anyone wouldn't want to take just 20 minutes to do that. Can you tell us a bit about the three levels of emotion that you mention in your book that attracts success? I believe you mentioned desire, belief, and a sense of knowing.

Trevor Blake
Yeah, and I talk about these in step three of "Three Simple Steps" because it's important to know that in order to be successful in life you don't have to believe. And that's contrary to, I think, a lot of --

MarySue Hansell
Yeah.

Trevor Blake
-- self-styled gurus which we talk about you'll see it when you believe it type of thing. And that's because "Three Simple Steps" talk about the science of source and the science of energy. You know, it doesn't matter whether you believe in the laws of nature or you believe in the laws of energy. There are going to be the laws of energy with or without your belief. They are physical laws. And so you can actually follow the principles in "Three Simple Steps." You can follow the discipline with a totally cynical attitude not believing in any of this at all and it's still going to work for you and that's the beauty of it because it takes the pressure away of having to think that you've got to believe and be positive all the time. You don't have to do that. You can be your normal personality, but just follow these techniques and you'll have some success. So the three levels of emotion that I talk about are there's a motion of desire and a lot of books talk about the need to have the strong desire for something. And I think if you have a desire, then you probably will change your life a little bit for the better, but it's going to be very vague. It could be anything. You've got no control over it. And then the next level is belief and I think if you have a strong belief in something, then with that focused attention you probably can influence the thing that you believe in to the extent that you get a little bit more of it, but you're not going to achieve a dream. You don't create E=MC2 or you don't create Google or Apple by simply having belief. Okay, what you have to do is get to a higher level of energy, emotional energy. And I call it a sense of knowing. Other people like Richard Branson call it a sense of flow or ecstasy. He says that if you can be happy in the present and have a plan for your future, that's enough for you to live in a state of awe and to gain flow for moving forward and I think he's right. But I prefer to talk about it as a sense of knowing and most women listening to this will say they understand what I'm talking about because they can pick points in their life where they just know something.

MarySue Hansell
Mm-hmm.

Trevor Blake
It makes no sense, but they just know because women have this incredibly strong intuition. Men have to work harder at their intuition and step three in "Three Simple Steps" provides techniques for men to work really hard at their intuition because all of my best decisions in life have been made intuitively rather than analytically. And so what you have to do is get to your emotional level to a sense of knowing where you can set a target for yourself and you can know that you're going to get it even if you don't know how or why. And there's lots of techniques and explanations in the search to help people to understand why that sense of knowing is a very achievable and it's a lot easier to get to a sense of knowing than it is to work around trying to believe in something that you don't really believe in.

MarySue Hansell
I think you mention in your book there's a big difference between having a goal and having an intention. I thought the listeners would really benefit from hearing you chat about that.

Trevor Blake
Well, there's no mystery about goals. Goals is a way of our -- it's our life. It's what we do. We go in the kitchen, we look in the refrigerator, it's empty. So we write the shopping list, we go to the grocery store, and we complete the shopping list and then refill the refrigerator. You know, what we've done is set a goal and completed the goal. There's nothing magical about that. That's fine. That's everyday life. In the workplace we set forecasts and budgets, management by objectives, performance and appraisal reviews, all of those things are a form of goal setting and that's just the way life is. People have made fortunes trying to teach goal setting techniques and it's just ridiculous because they're very, very simple. They talk about baby steps, being able to believe it, being able to achieve it. That's the way we live our life. That's how we live every day. But that doesn't allow you to create a life of dreams. You cannot create Google by baby steps. You can't create -- I couldn't create my companies by baby steps. When I was a sales manager, a reasonable stressed goal for me would be maybe to be a director or a vice president. But I didn't. I wanted to build America's fully virtual pharmaceutical company that took care of rare diseases. Now that's a major goal, okay? That's a massive thing. And so you have to have a completely different technique to achieve the dreams. And the technique I go for is called intentions and it's basically going back to the core of who you are and back almost to a childlike mentality to find out what it is that really turns you on and makes you tick. And then you take that and you use that as a control rod for the rest of your life and you use this talent that you've discovered in yourself in every aspect. No matter where you're working or the company or whatever you're doing, they become the vehicles by which you can help this inner core talent blossom. And when you do that, you move into a completely different world where goal setting becomes totally irrelevant and you can set this really high desire, this high dream which we will can an intention and then you imagine it as already achieved, and then you do the techniques that are in "Three Simple Steps." And what you end up doing is squashing time. So you bring time solution. I don't think we have time on this call to talk about why time is a solution, but it is. And so what you can do is you can imagine your future is already achieved, you can start to pull it to yourself now. And when you do that, you get into what's called the state of ecstasy. When you're in the state of ecstasy where you wake up in the morning with your stomach turning over because you're so excited about achieving this intention, you get into a state of awe. When you're in a state of awe, then you start to get to a state of flow. When you get to a state of flow, the black feeling disappears and all this incredible almost seems like miraculous synchronicity states to happen in your life. Things that you can't predict. Things that you can't imagine. Suddenly there's a phone call out of the blue, somebody knocks on the door, or you're in the Starbucks and you turn around and you spill coffee on somebody who turns out to be the most important person you ever met. All of those things happen when you get into this state of awe. If you get into a state of awe, you have to throw goal setting out of the window because it's boring and get into this world of intentions.

MarySue Hansell
Now you mention some great synchronicities in your book and I know Ray resonated a lot with the "Three Simple Steps." Ray, did you want to chat about something?

Raymond Hansell
Yeah, I just wanted to say that I've done a number of guided meditation exercises which is the second step that frequently say people skip. They want to get to the intentions and they want to get to the mentality, but they want to skip the meditation in many cases. And frankly, I have seen a distinct difference from the quiet time as opposed to a guided type of meditation. First of all, it takes a while but within a few weeks or days, what have you, to start to begin to get into this space that is where you just feel very, very differently. And I will say that after about the second or third week, I've been doing it about six weeks, that I would get a phone call at the end of the quiet time session out of the blue and it was something that would advance some of these intentions that I had. I also on the back end of this particular quiet time, would take a few minutes to sort of think about these intentions or these goals fulfilled as if they'd already happened and imaging what it would feel like. And so that's in a way it's going back to the stuff we talked about in the beginning where you're really sort of imagining things that you want to see happen before they happen, but tying it in to this particular quiet time. So I think it's -- I validate that it's a really good experience and also the goals versus intentions I think clearly that I sort of see a similarity with the vision board that people talk about sometimes where you're actually not --

Trevor Blake
Yeah.

Raymond Hansell
-- seeing something in front of you, but I think it's even more tangible than a vision board. You really have to sort of begin to experience it in your mind. Seeing it on a vision board is one thing, but to the extent that you can actually walk into a place and say, "I'd like that boat." Or, "I want to look at this house," or, "I've been to these places." And start to really experience it, it becomes realer or more vivid and I think the more vivid it gets, the more likely it's likely to happen and happen quickly.

MarySue Hansell
Sounds quite [Indiscernible], doesn't it?

Raymond Hansell
It is indeed. It is indeed.

MarySue Hansell
Mm-mmm.

Raymond Hansell
And it's just "Three Simple Steps." We're going to take another break at this point, but when we come back, we'll talk more with Trevor Blake, the author of this amazing "Three Simple Steps" book and my co-host, Greg. We'll be right back. [MUSIC] >> Stimulating talk. Gets those snaps in the brain fired really fast. All the time. The number one internet talk station where your opinion counts. VoiceAmerica.com. [MUSIC] [MUSIC] >> How can we make it a better world? >> I think we can make it a better world if we had peace among each other. >> Everybody needs to help their neighbor and then we'll spread from then on. >> I should do more. >> I can do more. >> I spend so much time on Facebook. >> How much time do I spend on Facebook? >> Probably more than I should be spending. >> I would definitely give back if I could find the time. >> Now you can help others just by playing a game on Facebook. It's called A Better World. Share your hopes and dreams. Do good deeds. Make a difference and have fun. Become a BetterWorldian. Join a community where all good deeds get rewarded. Log in today to find out how you can make a difference every day. >> For more information, visit Facebook.com\ABetterWorld. [MUSIC] >> Ask the experts. Call toll free right now, 1-866-472-5787. Hello? And ask our all-star team to answer your questions. That's 1-866-472-5787. Thank you for calling. VoiceAmerica.com. [MUSIC] >> This is BetterWorldians Radio with a family team of Ray, MarySue, and Gregory Hansell. To connect with the show today, please call us at 1-866-472-5788. That's 1-866-472-5788. You may also send us an email to radio@betterworldians.com. Now, back to BetterWorldians Radio. [MUSIC]

Gregory Hansell
Hey, Trevor. This is Greg.

Trevor Blake
Hi, Greg.

Gregory Hansell
You know, one thing I wanted to tell our listeners that I think almost summarizes the books. It's a quote and I see you also have it on your Twitter page is, "Our lives aren't meant to be a struggle, but a joyful trip." Can you talk about that?

Trevor Blake
Well, we live in a world where you hear all the time people saying in order to succeed you've got to fail a hundred times and that's okay. I've never failed and I've never failed because I took these three simple steps from the advice of self-made men and women. People Henry Ford wrote half a dozen self-help books himself and I was young enough and naïve enough to think well if it worked for him, then why wouldn't I give this a go? And so by following their advice, I've had an amazing adventure through life and I'm not saying it all downhill. Not at all. It was something that -- life is up and down, but having the tools to cope with the downs it allows you really enjoy the ups and that's fine. But I've never actually come across a situation where I can turn around and say oh I failed at that and that's okay so now I'll start again. I think life is supposed to be a joyful journey, a joyful adventure. And the reason I come up with that conclusion is that there's nothing mystical about life. We are energy. Everything is made up of energy. This is a scientific principle. It's now proven by the discovery of the Higgs Boson that we live in this energistic soup. And the only reason that we have this solid three dimensional, five sensory experience is because particles slow down in the Higgs Boson field and give us this sensation. That same knowledge often shows us that if we take the steps to try and improve our connection inside that energy field by taking quiet time or some form of transcendental meditation, by getting back into nature, immersing ourselves in nature on a regular basis, we connect with everything, with all that source of knowledge. And this what people like Andrew Carnegie and C.J. Walker used to talk about that they could connect with this sea of knowledge. And by connecting with that they could have these great ideas and they could have any tool that they need to overcome any particular challenge. And so their lives started off in tremendous adversity. I mean Henry Ford failed at two companies, but he didn't really fail. He started two companies and then change direction. That's his life. His whole life was a tremendous success. Andrew Carnegie, the same. And my life has been the same. I started and built four companies, sold two of them, and in the process of selling the third this summer. And that's what life is supposed to be like. It's supposed to be a great adventure, not quick sand, not a struggle, not a depressing experience. And the way you change it is by learning how to connect with the energy field in which you interact and you do it scientifically and you do it through the "Three Simple Steps."

Gregory Hansell
I love what you had to say about nature and you were talking a few minutes ago when discussing quiet time about the state of awe. I know you talk about the harmony of natural life and what you call connecting to the matrix. It reminded me last night when I was looking at this again of something from Wordsworth where he says, "With an on made quiet by the power of harmony and the deep power of joy we see into the life of things." And is that the kind of impact and experience that you've had when connecting with nature?

Trevor Blake
Yes, it is and it's also the experience that everyone who's read "Three Simple Steps," and I keep talking about "Three Simple Steps" like I'm pitching a book. All my proceeds go to cancer research and development. So I'm not doing this because I want to sell books. The book is out there. But I'm passionate about the message as are you which is why I'm on this radio show. So everybody else has read the book and reminded themselves, "You know what? You know, it's a long time since I walked barefoot on the grass," or, "You know, it's a long time since I actually saw a starry sky," because we get so busy in our lives we forget to do these things. And so the book reminds you to take a little time for yourself and go do that. And when they do that, it can be overwhelming. It's like it can be just this powerful reintroduction to a source of great knowledge and that's what all of these great people wrote about in their books and it's what I've experienced in my life. Because all of nature is also part of the energy field and all of nature's connected. But as human beings we tend to separate ourselves for some reason. We mentally think that, "Okay, I understand the laws of nature work in nature and I understand the laws of physics work outside of myself, but I'm me and I'm different." And that's not the truth. We're made up of exactly the same particles as everything else that's out there. There are only 12 particles and four forces of nature. We're made up of them, a tree is made up of them, a bird is made up of them. And so as you get back out into that nature, then you connect to all of that and it can only be beneficial.

Gregory Hansell
Yeah, I think that's true. I've had that experience myself. I'm just taking a walk in the woods and kind of experiencing that stillness, but also that dynamism that's kind of both there in nature has helped me kind of think through something and something I was working on I couldn't quite think through kind of appeared to me.

Trevor Blake
Well, it's also -- it's back up by science, too. There are some very well done studies here in America but also in Japan and Europe that show the mental and changes that happen when people get back into nature. They've even shown it with children with ADHD how they can almost cure ADHD by getting children back out into nature and getting them to play with soil because soil actually has the serotonin in it that goes through the skin and goes to the brain. So there are tremendous real life scientific reasons for getting back into nature. It's not feel good ideology. If you care about your life and your life is at stake, then immerse yourself in nature as often as you can.

Gregory Hansell
Absolutely. Something else I really loved in the book was you talk about the importance of being a wizard not a warrior. And contrasting wizards with warriors you say about wizards, "They live in a state of knowing that whatever they want can be attracted or created in response to their free will. No dragons have to die, no walls must be torn down. Wizards can simply create a new bag of treasure." Tell us about being a wizard.

Trevor Blake
Well, an idea I like to use is that two people, one's a warrior, one's a wizard and they're both hungry. And so the warrior says, "I need some bread," and he leaves his house and he goes on a long journey. He finds a castle and inside the castle is a bakery. And so he climbs over the castle wall and he steals into the bakery or sneaks into the bakery. He murders the baker and he steals the bread and he risks his life and he goes back to the house where he was with his colleague who is also hungry. While he was away, his colleague got some flour and some water and some butter and some eggs, and he baked himself a load of bread. Now there's nothing mystical about that. One is the wizard and one is the warrior. They've just chosen different ways to behave in the world and I think today we all behave a little bit too much like a warrior in that we seem to try to make stuff happen. We sort of like living in an Indiana Jones adventure where we step over all the bodies of the poor souls who didn't make it and the challenges get more and more difficult as we try to get the treasure which wasn't ours to begin with. And then steal the treasure and take it home. And I don't think nature works that way. I think nature works very effortlessly. It just is nature. And so I try to encourage people to change the mentality away from being too warrior like. You see it in business all the time where most companies end up in paralysis by analysis.

Gregory Hansell
Yeah.

Trevor Blake
And decisions are made on consensus. You know, we're going to sit in this room and we're going to have this meeting. It's going to go on for three hours until we're all in agreement. And that's kind of the mentality of the business world that I've come across. And there's one person in the room usually who has an intuitive idea that the decision that the board has made is wrong, but is too afraid to speak up. So what "Three Simples Steps" aims to do is to try and get the balance right between analyzing and doing and intuiting. So you get a nice sort of 50/50 balance between trust and intuition based upon the information or the data that's come to you rather than just focusing on the data which is how most of us live our lives. So I try -- I say it's not a bad thing to be a warrior. It's not a bad thing to be a wizard, but try to get the two together and you'll be very powerful.

Gregory Hansell
What part does imagination play in your success? You talk about it a lot in the book and I know that's part of the kind of wizarding path, as it were. How important do you think imagination is?

Trevor Blake
It's probably the most important thing of all because in our imagination -- and nothing happens without imagining it first. Nothing is ever built or created. No decision is ever made without imagining its outcome before you achieve that -- activate it or execute it. So imagination is the key thing. But most people I find are very -- they've never been taught how to use your imagination, how to use it for benefit. And you can -- we sort of see some of that so we go back into science and we talk about string theory. String theory is part of quantum physics and it shows two or three really fascinating things. One being everything's made of strings of energy. Two being that the higher the vibration, the more powerful the energy. And three being that for any energy to exist, it can only exist in 12 dimensions of space. And that's quite profound because we only know about three. We know about height, width, and depth. That's our three dimensional world that we live in, but science tell us that there's more dimensions out there that we can't perceive and one of them is imagination. So if you imagine something it doesn't exist at this point. It's in your imagination. You're actually connecting with one of these other dimensions of space and in physic sense, space is a measurement, not something out in outer space, it's a measurement. So you're actually able to connect beyond that three dimensional world where it's a whole lot easier to imagine building something great --

Gregory Hansell
Mm-hmm.

Trevor Blake
-- in this other dimension than to have to try and build it in the three dimensions. You know, if I wanted a super car I have to find a way to make a super car in this three dimensional world that I live in. But if I imagine owning a super car and I create it in this other dimension, it has no choice because it can only exist in 12 dimensions of space. It has no choice but to suddenly turn up in my three dimensional experience. And that seems like magic, but it's actually science. And that's what you do with your imagination. So if you can get your -- and "Three Simple Steps" has lots of techniques for how to use your imagination, how to make it more vivid, how to make it more specific. You know, that's why we talk about window shopping earlier. So if you're able to imagine in great detail the thing that you want and you can do that by touching it and feeling it and experiencing it as often as you can, then you can bring it into your world without having to do very much effort at all.

Gregory Hansell
You mentioned just a few minutes ago that you've decided to donate all the proceeds from "Three Simple Steps" to charity in part to show your readers you come from a place of authenticity. Why is that important?

Trevor Blake
Because I'm afraid most self-help books and business inspiration books as I've read in life are written by people whose only taste of success is the fact that the book caught on. And before the book caught on, they really didn't have any. In fact, if you delve into some of their lives, you find out that you could use some negative labels and say they were probably charlatans or snake oil sales people. And for some reason their message resonated and some very, very successful, very well sold books that are like that. And even if the information in those books is useful, there's a question of credibility over the author. So I didn't write "Three Simple Steps" until after I sold my second company so I felt that gave me the credibility to talk about what it takes to achieve a piece of the American dream and I thought that it gave me that bit of authenticity and credibility. But to round it off, because I don't need the money, I also donate all my proceeds from the book but also any activity associated with the book to cancer research and development, but not to a charity because I know some charities and they're run by very highly paid executes. Now if you've gone to all the bother of spending 10 hard earned dollars on a book, you want to insure that the profits from that book, the proceeds, if they're going to cancer research and development, they actually go into the laboratory and do some good, not into the pocket of an executive who's got a high expense account. So what I actually do is donate all the profits to a non-profit cancer research and development project called Neovia which is working on cancer drugs without side effects.

Gregory Hansell
That's interesting. We've kind of had that experience ourselves. You know, we're a social enterprise here at Tune-ups and A Better World so we're a for profit company that's trying to do good and we select non-profit partners or channel partners to work with. We make sure that there's that most bang for the buck because people want to know, like you just said, that if they're donating to a cause, that's where their money's going to and not to administration or whatnot.

Trevor Blake
Absolutely. And so every cent goes directly into the which I think is fantastic. You know, it's a win-win for everybody.

Gregory Hansell
I think that's wonderful. So you ask at the end of the book about wanting people to give you feedback and what's feedback been like from people who've read your book and what does it mean for you to hear that feedback?

Trevor Blake
Oh, it's been -- I mean the quality of quantity of feedback have been overwhelming and what I hadn't anticipated when I wrote this book was that it would come from all over the world. And of course I should have anticipated it because the book's been in the airports and people have picked it up as they're flying back to their home and you can read it in two hours. And it's just been fantastic. I've heard from as an example, a 13 year old in Sri Lanka who was contemplating suicide, but is now a ballet dancer to an ex-professor of economics in West Virginia who sent me a letter saying the book has given him the tools he needs to start a project he'd been procrastinating on for a couple of decades. And he was very exciting and he's jumping out of bed looking forward to his day. And then at the end of the letter he just in an offhand comment mentions that he's 89 years old. I mean that's been the overwhelming part of it for me just to touch lives in that way. But I wasn't surprised by any of the feedback because I've been teaching these principles along my journey for the last 25 years and I've seen people's lives completely transform as a result. So I was expecting the feedback. I just hadn't anticipated the quantity or the range of it really.

Gregory Hansell
All right, one last question. It's the question I ask every guest at the end of our show. As I frequently say because it's the last question we only have about a minute for the answer unfortunately. And it's a big question which is how do you hope will be improved by the work you're doing? What's the vision of how the world is different because of this book and because of your philosophy and in what you're trying to do?

Trevor Blake
I get asked by that by people who have read the book and my answer is always the same is that your only responsibility in life is to be all you can be. You don't have to change the world, you don't -- you can't have intentions or desires for other people because they're very personal and powerful. So all you can do when you get this powerful knowledge is to be all you can be. Be a leading light to everybody else and then as people see how you've changed, they might be interested in finding out how or why and then they may also change and want to change themselves. But the best thing you can be in life for your friends, your friends, or your colleagues is to be all you can be.

Raymond Hansell
Well, that is great advice. It's a piece of advice I will give today as I do in every one of our shows is to be a BetterWorldian and that's really about being the best version of yourself because it will affect the entire world eventually. You can find out more about Trevor Blake's amazing book, "Three Simple Steps" by going to TrevorGBlake.com. Trevor, once again, we'd like to thank you for joining us today on BetterWorldians Radio and for all the great work that you're doing in the world.

Trevor Blake
Thank you, Ray. Thank you, folks. I really enjoyed it.

MarySue Hansell
Thank you, thank you, Trevor.

Raymond Hansell
We did as well. Please join us next week on BetterWorldians Radio when we'll be talking with Anne Beiler, the founder of Auntie Anne's Pretzels, about her life journey of faith and forgiveness and her amazing story of success with the Auntie Anne franchise. We have an excellent lineup of guests in the coming weeks and if you know an unsung BetterWorldian who would make a great guest on our show, please send us an email at radio@BetterWorldians.com. In the meantime, we'd like to thank everyone today for listening. You can join millions of people playing our game on Facebook, A Better World, at Facebook.com\ ABetterWorld. And don't forget to check out the Legends of Oz collections that we now have in our game as part and parcel of our alliances with the Legends of Oz Dorothy's Return film that's now out in the movie theaters. Until next time everybody, in the meantime, please be a Better Worldian. [MUSIC] >> Thank you again for helping make the world just a little bit better this week. Please join your hosts Ray, MarySue, and Gregory Hansell next Thursday at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, 8:00 a.m. Pacific on the Voice America Variety Channel. We hope we've inspired you to do one small thing to help make a big difference. Join us at BetterWorldians.com to tell us what you've done to change the world. [MUSIC]