Healthy Eating, Healthy Life
Podcast #39 — Aired August 7, 2014

There’s a real connection between eating well and feeling good. This week on BetterWorldians Radio, we’ll talk with a renowned chef about how he’s helping give kids the nutritional foundation they need to grow and thrive. Our guest this week is Marc Vetri, the executive chef and owner of the acclaimed Vetri Family Restaurants in Philadelphia: Vetri Ristorante, Osteria, and Amis. Vetri will discuss how the Vetri Foundation for Children is improving school lunches and changing lives in the process. Tune in every week to hear new guests share how they are making the world a better place and to learn how you can become a BetterWorldian!

 

 

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Chef Marc Vetri
Co-Founder, Vetri Foundation for Children
Chef & Owner, Vetri Family Restaurants

Marc Vetri is the executive chef and owner of the acclaimed Vetri Family Restaurants in Philadelphia: Vetri Ristorante, Osteria, Amis, and the forthcoming Alla Spina. Within two years of opening his eponymous Philadelphia restaurant, Marc was named one of Food & Wine’s Ten Best New Chefs and received the Philadelphia Inquirer’s highest restaurant rating. In 2005, Marc won the James Beard Award for “Best Chef Mid-Atlantic.” Marc is the author of Rustic Italian Food, released in 2011 and il viaggio di vetri, a collection of more than 125 of his most-requested dishes. Marc is extremely passionate about giving back to the community. In 2008, Marc and business partner Jeff Benjamin created the Vetri Foundation For Children. Taking the lessons learned by years in the culinary world, Marc helps creates environments for children that promote healthy eating and lifestyle choices thus having an impact on their overall health and wellness.

Episode Transcript

Raymond Hansell
On this week's episode of BetterWorldians Radio we are discussing the Vetri Foundation for children with Chef Marc Vetri. Marc Vetri is the executive chef and owner of the acclaimed Vetri Family Restaurants in Philadelphia including Vetri Restaurant, Osteria, Amis and the forthcoming Alla Spina. Within two years of opening Vetri, Mark was named one of Food and Wine's ten best new chefs and received the Philadelphia Inquirer's highest restaurant rating. In 2004, Marc won the James Beard Award for best chef Mid-Atlantic. Marc is author of the book Rustic Italian Food and il Viaggio di Vetri. Marc is extremely passionate about giving back to the community. For years he's maintained a strong commitment to several non-profits and in 2008 Marc and his business partner Jeff Benjamin created the Vetri Foundation for Children. Taking the lessons learned by years in the culinary world, Marc helps create environments for children to promote healthy eating and lifestyle choices thus having an impact on their overall health and wellness.

Gregory Hansell
Hi Marc, this is Greg. Its so great to have you with us today on BetterWorldians Radio. Thank you for joining us.

Marc Vetri
Hey you guys, how are you. Thank you.

Gregory Hansell
Good. Listen I want to tell you personally that I'm a huge fan of your work and have had some of the best meals of my life at your restaurants so thank you.

Marc Vetri
Oh, thank you very much. I'm happy.

Gregory Hansell
Really amazing.

Marc Vetri
I hope you didn't have any really horrible meals.

Gregory Hansell
Not yet. So Marc, you're a very well respected chef across the country and particularly here in the Philadelphia area. Can you tell us a bit about your restaurants?

Marc Vetri
Sure well the first restaurant we opened was Vetri and that was in 1998. I had just opened. It was just this little 30 seater and I just wanted to open up something where I could just make some nice food. So we opened that up and that's in the original [ph] LaBenkfin space so there was a lot of history there. We opened that up in 1998 and now its 16 years ago. It seems like forever. I had that one for nine years and then we opened up the second, Osteria, we opened up and then after that we started moving a little bit faster and then started opening restaurants a little faster. Nowadays folks open up a restaurant and within a year they want another restaurant. I was always on the slower moving road.

Gregory Hansell
So when did you first really become interested in cooking?

Marc Vetri
I started really young. My father used to make Sunday meals and I always used to hang out with them and I was always asking him, "what are you doing, show me how you're making this", and then later when I was ten or eleven we used to head down to his mom's house down in South Philly and we used to have the big Sunday meals with the meatballs and macaroni and all that stuff. I always sort of found myself hanging out in the kitchen. Then I used to ask hey maybe I can head down a little early to help her out so it was always one of those things that I liked. Then even in high school, I used to work a couple nights a week in a local restaurant and it was always kind of something that I liked. I always sort of fell back on it. Through the years whatever I sort of went into, I always ended up working at a restaurant. I was like hey maybe this restaurant thing is something I should follow since I like it so much.

Gregory Hansell
When was it that food really became important to you?

Marc Vetri
Food was always there. It was always around everything. I used to remember when we had the Sunday family meals. It seems like all of my memories when I was younger was always around food. So eventually I actually moved out to Los Angeles and I went to music school there but in order to make money I was obviously working in the restaurant. After sort of four years of that I was at this sort of road where I didn't know what I wanted to do and I was really liking restaurants. Then I had this opportunity to go to Italy and I sort of hopped on it and that was when I went sort of full immersion into food. That was like the moment when I just knew that this is really what I want to do with the rest of my life.

Gregory Hansell
Sure. Can you tell the listeners a bit about what you see is the power of food to connect people?

Marc Vetri
Oh my god. We only have an hour. I can start a little bit. Food is really everything. I see it obviously I am very much involved in it. For me, food solves almost all of our world's problems. If we start eating right, if we start farming more locally, if we start understanding where food comes from, we start being healthier. We start eating right. A number of different health issues just vanish. And then there's the whole other side of it. Food and your memories. Every single happy memory that I have, maybe not every single memory, is always around something about food, something about eating, something about sitting around a table laughing with some friends, eating something. You're out somewhere having a nice meal. Its always around food so that whole connection I think is a little bit lacking nowadays. I think if we really try to reconnect ourselves I think that's really going to help everybody.

Gregory Hansell
I think so too. I feel that same way about food. It's played a really important part in my life. Its something that I love. Some of my favorite memories are about sitting down with my family or friends and having a meaningful conversation.

Marc Vetri
Sure and think about what you ate then also. It was always like something home cooked or something -- it was never some sort of pre-packaged this or that. It was always like you went to the market. You got some vegetables. You made something to eat, which is obviously much, much healthier also. If everyone just started making food again, cooking, the world would be much healthier.

Gregory Hansell
I think so too. Its funny. My sister makes fun of me but I was actually telling her a story here recently about a meal I had at Vetri, if you don't mind me saying.

Marc Vetri
No please.

Gregory Hansell
It was years ago now but it was this goat dish and she makes fun of me because I said I took a bite of it and it threw me back in my chair. Its the one thing I want to tell the listeners about the quality food of your restaurants but also just to really underline what you're saying, this importance, this magic of cooking and how dishes that are well prepared with local ingredients and quality ingredients can really reconnect us to something I think.

Marc Vetri
Sure, its a big effort also. Listen nothing that's worth anything is easy so its an effort for us also to find the goats that are local here and that are actually raised like they're just this wild raised on a farm, eating the right things that they would normally eat. Then the animals they're also healthier but if you start to farm them and to feed them things that they normally would never eat just to fatten the up a little bit, somethings not going to fit. If they naturally are herbivores they're going to eat what they want to eat but if you start to feed them something else, somethings not right in their system so then if you eat them somethings also not going to be right. Its a whole process and it has to start at the roots level.

Gregory Hansell
I agree. So tell us how Vetri Foundation grew out of this personal passion for food that you're talking about.

Marc Vetri
Well the Vetri Foundation started sort of as a secondary thing. We used to have -- we still have this event that initially started as a fundraiser for the Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation. We just had our ninth year of it. We started this event nine years ago called the Great Chess Event. Initially it was a fundraiser for Alex's Lemonade. What happened was we met this guy. Actually I think they were on your show once.

Gregory Hansell
Yeah, I was just about to say we actually did a show with them. They were great.

Marc Vetri
They're amazing and they have just an amazing foundation. We met them probably ten years ago soon after they had lost Alex. They were at the restaurant and that was when we had the one restaurant. We decided to have a little fundraiser for them so we got some local chefs like six or seven and we had this event at the restaurant school. We raised a little bit of money and it was a really nice evening. Then through the year we got to know them a little bit more and we decided let's have another one of those. That was a lot of fun. We decided to invite some out of state chefs and it was a little bit larger and we had just recently opened Osteria so we had it there. We raised that year about $75,000. All of a sudden this thing started to snowball. Then year after year it went from 75 to 150,000 to 300,000 and around the fourth or fifth year, the fourth year maybe, we started to think this is an amazing foundation but we also want to help out some things that we're very passionate about. We started to think about food a little bit. Around then there was a lot of talk about school lunch or the lack thereof of it and how awful they are and how its just like we are really feeding our children just nothing that has any sort of nutritional value at all. We started to do research. We just started looking into it and right about then we started forming the Vetri Foundation, the 501C3. We started doing research after research and we realized that the void was this school lunch and no one is really advocating for them so we decided to come up with our own school lunch program and put it in some schools. So the initial thing started there and then obviously it has evolved over the last five years.

Gregory Hansell
Well I'm going to let MarySue ask a bunch of questions about those lunches and how it works after the break but I did want to ask one more thing before we head to break. You mentioned going to Italy as sort of a seminal moment in your personal development and that's how food became important to you. I'm actually half Italian. I lived in Italy for a semester in college and have been back a bunch of times. In living there I learned the phrase, "il Piacere di Stare a Tavola", the pleasure at the table.

Marc Vetri
At the table, yeah.

Gregory Hansell
Yeah and you mentioned something about it a few minutes ago. For the listeners, the concepts about the importance of staying at the table, enjoying the company of family and friends and together discussing what's important and meaningful for us. I was just curious as we head to break if you can tell us how much was that concept of staying at the table part of the plans for Vetri Foundation and something you wanted to impart to these kids?

Marc Vetri
Very much so. I mean that's I think the major thing within our foundation that a lot of other foundations I think miss. They're very focused on the food you're eating. We're focused on the food you're eating but also how you're eating it. I think that's missed a little bit. Just like you mentioned in Italy, I just remember when I was off, I didn't have any money. I didn't have anywhere to go. I didn't really know anybody so it was always one of the workers would invite me over to their house. They all live at home until they're married. That's just the way it is in Italy. The mom would make this amazing lunch and everyone would sit down and eat and then everyone would start to just talk about things. I was just like wow, this is awesome. I think it really makes an impact.

Gregory Hansell
I think it does.

Raymond Hansell
Well, we need to take a break right now but we'll talk more with Marc Vetri when we come back and my co-host MarySue. In the meantime, I'd like to offer this challenge to our listeners. If you know someone whose acts no matter how small are making a big difference in the lives of other people, we'd love to hear about them. Please send us an email at Radio@BetterWorldians.com. (Music)

Raymond Hansell
You're listening to BetterWorldians Radio. We're speaking with chef Marc Vetri and now let's welcome back Marc and MarySue.

MarySue Hansell
Hi Marc.

Marc Vetri
Hello, how are you?

MarySue Hansell
Very good. This is Greg's Italian mother.

Marc Vetri
The good side then, right. The better half in all senses of the word.

MarySue Hansell
There we go. You know we were talking before about the Vetri Foundation with Greg a little bit. I wanted to talk more about your big program there Eatiquette. Could you tell us what that is and how you came up with that name?

Marc Vetri
Well the name was actually probably from I think one of the Board members. He just kind of shot it out there and everyone was like wow, that's it. There was not much of a discussion about it. It just basically describes what it is. We started off discussing the school lunch, how it is now. What happens? You walk in, you line up, everybody waits in line, they slop some food on your thing and then you go sit. You don't know where you're going to sit. You just kind of sit. You may end up alone so obviously the first thing that we thought was we have to make some healthier food so we made this five or six week menu that obviously after the five or six weeks it starts over again. We just made a menu with healthier items on it. Nothing like mind blowing or anything. Just kind of simple food. We always have a salad. We always have a starch which is a vegetable. We always have some sort of meat or some sort of fish. So then we had to say well how do you want to serve it because this whole lining up. You have 30 minutes and the guy at the end of the line has like four minutes to eat anything because he's obviously at the end of the line. So we basically were like hey this whole family style thing, how could that work? We thought well how about if we start off with round tables so they could all sit around.

MarySue Hansell
Yeah, that's a neat idea. I love those round tables.

Marc Vetri
Then we thought well let's make it more interesting. Let's maybe have one of the students show up early, five minutes early. So one student from each of the tables shows up early. We have a little chef jackets for them so they feel like they're working and they set everything up. The fork goes here, the knife goes here, the water goes here, this goes here, so they set up their specific table.

MarySue Hansell
So they have a job of being, I think you're calling them captains.

Marc Vetri
That actually turned into they look forward to that. They wanted that. It was an honor.

MarySue Hansell
Oh absolutely. What do you think the children learn from being a table captain?

Marc Vetri
You just learn simple things that you don't really think about but they are responsible for everyone eating and to make everything look nice. They like that so they're obviously going to learn a lot. But then after so they set everything up then all of the students arrive and they all sit. So they all sit all right away. Then we had the chef walk out to announce what they've made you. So basically he announces the menu. So I blah-blah-blah or the lunch for this afternoon is roast this with a salad of this and this. So its like we're looking at them like with a little bit more respect. We're sort of telling them what we've made for them this afternoon and its just a really nice thing I think to start the lunch out with. Then the one student who set everything up walk up and they get the food and its all served family style so its all on one large platter and they actually place it right in the middle of the table. Then they help to hand it out to everyone so everyone there is learning how to interact and how to share and how to ask for things. Its a whole thing that you would normally think nothing of but there's a lot of lessons there.

MarySue Hansell
Oh there sure is. I see sometimes you have an adult sit at the table. What do you --

Marc Vetri
Yeah, often. I mean that just sort of helps the flow. More so with the younger ones because sometimes you have these really large platters and then you have these seven year olds who are not even able to lift them up so they have to help them and make sure that everybody has the right amount. Everyone is supposed to get the same amount. We measure everything out based on the amount of seats there so if there's eight of you then you're all supposed to get three ounces of this. Obviously that's what we're going to leave out there for you. Sometimes the adults sort of help in organizing everything and just kind of making everything go a little bit smoother.

MarySue Hansell
I was looking at your website and I saw that you served over 300,000 healthy meals so far.

Marc Vetri
Yeah! We're in about ten different schools now and we're starting another two this year. We're sort of just out there trying to get different schools involved and we're adding things as the years go on. Its really just a wonderful program.

MarySue Hansell
That's wonderful. How many chefs do you have involved in the whole program?

Marc Vetri
Well so we have our chefs who work with us and they basically head around and they show the chefs at the actual schools how to make these things.

MarySue Hansell
That's great.

Marc Vetri
When we start a new school, we have our team go to the school and we'll show them how to order, how to inventory. We'll show them all of the recipes. We'll show them how to make everything. We'll spend a good two months with them to just make sure that we hit all the menus with them. We show them how to make all the recipes.

MarySue Hansell
I was looking as I said at your website and I saw a story about one of your interns, Catherine, working with the children. She had some interesting things to say I thought would be nice for our listeners to hear from her perspective if you recall her story.

Marc Vetri
I mean we have so many things up on the website now. Maybe you could just refresh my memory.

MarySue Hansell
Sure. I really was going to ask you, was the interns part of the -- you have chef interns that help in the school program, is that how it works?

Marc Vetri
Oh yeah. We have a whole staff here at the Vetri Foundation and then for all of the restaurants also we have a lot of sign-up sheets. We have staff from all the restaurants signing up to help out at the different schools so we'll have chefs from all the restaurants helping out. Its a nice way to get involved also. If you're working in the organization, you're very aware of the foundation. You're very aware of the mission and you're very aware of our philosophies.

MarySue Hansell
Yeah I think she was talking about the great atmosphere in the lunchroom and the food prep and teaching the kids. Maybe you could shed some light on how you get the kids involved in food prep and clean-up.

Marc Vetri
Some of them like to watch. Many of our schools have the lunchroom is like wide open so you can sort of see into the kitchen and you can watch everyone in there so a lot of them stick their heads in and they're like what are you making? What are you making? What are you doing? Show me that. Its really nice. Certain students really love it and then they ask, hey maybe I can come help out one day. Maybe I can volunteer. Its nice. We like to think that the ones who really love it will maybe someday get involved in the industry.

MarySue Hansell
Wouldn't that be nice.

Marc Vetri
Yeah.

MarySue Hansell
What's some of your favorite stories that you could recall from what some of the kids said in the lunchroom about having this wonderful food served to them in such a wonderful manner?

Marc Vetri
The amazing things happen usually later. When I hear stories that they went home and they're at the market with their mom and dad and they start looking for fresh vegetables because they want to make a salad like they had at their lunch. That's the real success. They can all say obviously listen I love it when I walk around the lunchroom and they're eating fish that they would have never eaten and that everyone says they're not going to eat it and they're eating. And they're eating salad and they're eating rice and they're eating all these things that they've really never eaten fresh before but they're liking it and they love it and when I walk over they're like awe I've never had this before and I love it. What is this? They ask what it is. I sort of tell them. But every now and then you hear stories like their mom and dad or some of the schools we have these parent nights where we invite all of their parents in just to have a little discussion just to see if its made any sort of -- if they're thinking about it at all, if they're talking about it at all in the home and it happens often and it just makes me feel just really amazing that when they're at the market they ask for these items, these healthy items that they've never ever asked for. When they ask why they're like oh we had this for lunch and I wanted to make it. They let me have the recipe for it. Its just amazing. That's what we want. We want them to bring it home and to share this with their families and to make it more of a whole community thing. That's where it really starts to get infectious.

MarySue Hansell
Well Marc, it certainly sounds like the school lunch program, the Eatiquette Program has not only changed the children's lives but also the parents.

Marc Vetri
That's the goal.

MarySue Hansell
It makes them cook healthier when they're home too.

Marc Vetri
Yes.

Raymond Hansell
We know we've arrived when people start actually asking for reservations at one of the schools.

MarySue Hansell
That would be nice.

Raymond Hansell
I think I'd like to go back to West Philly High School and see if I can get a reservation there.

Marc Vetri
There you go.

Raymond Hansell
In the meantime we're going to have to take another break. When we come back I'll be talking more with Marc Vetri and we'll be right back. (Music)

Raymond Hansell
Hi, we're back now with Chef Marc Vetri, the Founder of Vetri Foundation for Children. Marc, this is Ray and welcome aboard our segment. I'd like to start out by just reminding pretty much everyone in Philadelphia that you have some of the best restaurants here in Philly.

Marc Vetri
I think so.

Raymond Hansell
Around the country I think that acknowledgement is starting to build in a big way. Many of our listeners however don't know that a portion of all your proceeds from the restaurants go directly to the Vetri Foundation for Children, which is awesome. Can you tell me a little bit about it and also the patrons can actually donate right from their table, is that correct as well?

Marc Vetri
Well that's how the whole thing works basically. We match whatever anybody lets us have. So we have this little thing that we hand out with the bill and we just say hey, here's a little bit of some information about the Vetri Foundation and if you feel like you want to leave a little extra for it, feel free or you could leave with this envelope and you could mail it in later. Then we basically match that. Yeah, it ends up to be quite a large number at the end of the year.

Raymond Hansell
That's fantastic.

Marc Vetri
And its nice. I think it lets everyone know that we don't only talk about it but we also act on it.

Raymond Hansell
You walk the walk as they say.

Marc Vetri
We walk the walk. I didn't want to use the line that everyone uses so I thought I'd come up with something else.

Raymond Hansell
You could step away from that expression.

Marc Vetri
Its a cliché, I know, but it fits.

Raymond Hansell
What are some of the other ways that people can actually help?

Marc Vetri
Well I mean volunteering. That's always amazing. We have a lot of our regulars who volunteer. Its as easy as knowing how to use a knife or just letting us have an extra hand. You can work at any of the schools and whatever two or three hours in the morning to help slice lettuce or whatever it is. Whatever we're actually making. I mean that's just an amazing way to help.

Raymond Hansell
I would imagine listening to some of the other segments that both Greg and MarySue went through with you that its got to be hard getting some of these kids to eat healthy foods sometimes for the first time to eat something other than some type of chicken nugget thing or something. How do you encourage the kids to try something new?

Marc Vetri
You know what, that is I mean honestly I think that's the myth that actually holds everyone out from moving to more healthier items. I can't tell you how often it is that we start a new school and we show the lunch, the woman or man who makes the lunch their now and you're okay so here's the menu that we're going to do and they look at it and they start laughing like they're never going to eat this. I'm like okay, well. Everyone is always like so negative. They're never going to eat it. They're never going to eat it. We just have to say to them no, they will eat it but its always the adults who are just negative about it. I think that's just like so normal for our society now. Then the first lunch when we have all these happy smiling children that are eating fish and they're eating roasted zucchini and some lettuce, they're all like oh, I can't believe they ate that. Like of course you can't but I know. I think that's also the other side of that is how they eat it. Number one, they're eating family style so there's a lot of articles now well we've been letting them have healthy food and it ends up in the garbage. My response is always if you line them up and you just have this whole thing of some apples for them, nobody is going to eat an apple. But if you slice up an apple and you leave it right in the middle and they're interacting with each other and they're going to eat an apple slice and they're interacting, they're not even going to realize that they're eating an apple so that's the whole thing. I have three little ones and they would never eat an apple. You have this large apple. What is that? How am I going to eat it? But if I slice up apples and I just leave them there they're all going to be like I want an apple slice! I want an apple slice! I want an apple slice! So its also the way that they're eating it. You have to almost fool them into eating it but they end up loving it.

Raymond Hansell
I remember when I first entered this Italian family that I'm part of. Its the whole experience. It's the round table. Its the smells. The smells just hit you. The aroma just hits you and then its the presentation of the food in a form that you haven't seen before and the willingness to experiment and then its a pretty contagious cuisine. I mean once you get a little nibble, I mean you are hooked. I mean you'll try --

Marc Vetri
Look at you, you married right into it.

Raymond Hansell
What did I just eat? I can't believe it. That's fantastic. I've got to have more and it happens often to people.

Marc Vetri
Its infectious. It really is. Its the same thing just eating around a round table. Its that whole thing of the interaction which is obviously, listen nowadays with the iPhones and all these new technology things, social interaction is less and less evident. So to make that happen while you're eating lunch, its a big thing.

Raymond Hansell
Well what ideas or suggestions do you have for those people, our listeners, who want to get their children involved in the process of preparing home meals, family meals at home? What ideas might you share with our listeners?

Marc Vetri
Its very simple. You ready for this?

Raymond Hansell
Yeah, go.

Marc Vetri
The easiest thing in the world. Just start to cook. That's it. That's all you have to do. They will love it. They will hop on it. They will start asking things. They will want to do it every single night. Just start to cook. That's it. Its that easy.

Raymond Hansell
Can you hand me that pot? Can you (overlapping) just a little bit.

Marc Vetri
Folks ask me, I have a large organization now also. How do you start leading? I say you know how to start leading? You start leading. That's all you have to do. Just start. Its the same thing. There's no miracle thing. There's no oh my god you have to start with this and you have to buy this and you have to organize this. No, just you know what? Walk around the market and just hey let's get that, let's get this and just make something. That's it. That's all you need to do.

Raymond Hansell
Analysis can lead to paralysis. There's another cliché.

Marc Vetri
You're full of clichés today.

Raymond Hansell
Its just the cliché section of the show.

Marc Vetri
There you go.

Raymond Hansell
I'm going to bring it home but I mean clearly if you just take that first step, start to cook as you're suggesting. Perhaps ask somebody can you hand me that, could you do this, could you cut this up and the next thing you know they're involved. The experience is very different than here's your prepackaged. Its in the microwave.

Marc Vetri
Absolutely. You put the salt in. You stick the oil in. You do this. I mean just anything. They love to get involved and you'll all be healthier for it.

Raymond Hansell
Now I have to ask you this question that we ask at the end of every one of our shows. What is your vision for how the Vetri Foundation for Children and the Eatiquette mission of providing a better school lunch can help make the world a better place?

Marc Vetri
Well my vision is that that is the way that you eat school lunch from now on in every school in America. I can tell you, if we start everyone from first grade all the way up just the skills and the mindfulness and just the healthiness of what they're eating, I think it would really change the world.

Raymond Hansell
Well that's a great way for us to wrap-up. A better school lunch presented by BetterWorldians Radio and a better world and that's a wonderful fit. I really thank you for joining us today on BetterWorldians Radio.

Marc Vetri
Oh, my pleasure. Thank you so much for having me.

Raymond Hansell
You're very welcome. As we end our show each week we like to share our mission as well here at BetterWorldians. We are about making the world a better place by encouraging the best in everyone. We focus on positive thinking, positive values and positive actions. In short, our vision is to bring out the BetterWorldians in everybody so that all of us can make it a better world. Today we had a guest that really talked about how you can do that in your own kitchen, in your own life and he and his fellow chefs at the Vetri Foundation are making a difference every day in the lives of children right here in Philadelphia. We'd like to thank everyone today for listening. In the meantime you can join the BetterWorldians community at BetterWorldians.com. Until next time, please be a BetterWorldians. (Music)